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FAITHFUL. FOCUSED. FOR YOU.

Your family will fit right in! Visit a Lutheran School today.

DISCOVER THE DIFFERENCE

Lutherans founded the first elementary school in Indiana, public or private. We’re committed to educational excellence.

WELCOME TO THE LUTHERAN SCHOOLS

We are 17 elementary and middle schools across northeast Indiana, plus Concordia Lutheran High School. Find a Lutheran School near you.

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Faithful. Focused. For You.

The Lutheran Schools Partnership represents more than 4,000 students enrolled in 17 elementary and middle schools across northeast Indiana, plus Concordia Lutheran High School in Fort Wayne. With so many options available, you’re sure to find the right fit for your child!

Lutheran schools are Christ-centered, nationally accredited, and follow Indiana state standards. Private tuition assistance, SGO grants, and Indiana Choice Scholarships are available to help make the Lutheran schools affordable.

Our commitment to education runs deep. Lutherans founded the very first school in northeast Indiana in 1837, and it still serves students today. Come discover why Hoosier parents have been choosing Lutheran schools for more than 175 years!

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Best Practices
Alicia Levitt | May 26, 2019
Reflecting on Another School Year
The end of the school year has come, and rather quickly, it seems! The final days of a school year are often filled with many emotions. Joy, sorrow, regret, fulfillment, and more can mingle together in our hearts and minds. As students, teachers, and parents say goodbye to a school year, the way we reflect upon the year can be a powerful tool.Recent research on the topic of reflection by Dr. Carol Dweck, Dr. David Yeager, and others has focused on how reflection affects our mindset and ability to change our thinking. When we intentionally reflect on an experience by thinking or talking about it and especially by writing about it, our ability to grow and learn from that experience increases significantly (Dweck, et al., 2014). Our school year is an experience through which we can grow by reflecting. Perhaps there is a particular area in which a student has been struggling. How can we point him or her toward the growth they have achieved? How can we reflect upon the struggle in ways that demonstrate that change is possible? How can we remind students of their successes? We can guide reflection in many powerful ways. Having a discussion during which we share our “roses and thorns” helps us to reflect on the good and the bad. Writing ourselves a letter to be opened in a number of years can be a fun way to think about how our growth will look in the future. Keeping a journal is another powerful reflection tool. Looking for more ideas? Here is a fun list of reflection questions that can be used with students in a classroom or at home, and it includes a link to another list of questions teachers can ask themselves, as well. No matter what, let us not forget that we are reflecting on the blessings that the Lord has provided for us. Scripture tells us often not to forget, notably in Psalm 103:2, “Bless the Lord, oh my soul, and forget not all His benefits.” May we always do so!
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Christian Leadership
Alicia Levitt | May 26, 2019
Reflecting on Another School Year
The end of the school year has come, and rather quickly, it seems! The final days of a school year are often filled with many emotions. Joy, sorrow, regret, fulfillment, and more can mingle together in our hearts and minds. As students, teachers, and parents say goodbye to a school year, the way we reflect upon the year can be a powerful tool.Recent research on the topic of reflection by Dr. Carol Dweck, Dr. David Yeager, and others has focused on how reflection affects our mindset and ability to change our thinking. When we intentionally reflect on an experience by thinking or talking about it and especially by writing about it, our ability to grow and learn from that experience increases significantly (Dweck, et al., 2014). Our school year is an experience through which we can grow by reflecting. Perhaps there is a particular area in which a student has been struggling. How can we point him or her toward the growth they have achieved? How can we reflect upon the struggle in ways that demonstrate that change is possible? How can we remind students of their successes? We can guide reflection in many powerful ways. Having a discussion during which we share our “roses and thorns” helps us to reflect on the good and the bad. Writing ourselves a letter to be opened in a number of years can be a fun way to think about how our growth will look in the future. Keeping a journal is another powerful reflection tool. Looking for more ideas? Here is a fun list of reflection questions that can be used with students in a classroom or at home, and it includes a link to another list of questions teachers can ask themselves, as well. No matter what, let us not forget that we are reflecting on the blessings that the Lord has provided for us. Scripture tells us often not to forget, notably in Psalm 103:2, “Bless the Lord, oh my soul, and forget not all His benefits.” May we always do so!
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Funding the Mission
Mark Muehl | Aug 25, 2019
SGO Results and Causes
The fiscal year has ended for the SGO program. As of June 30, donors across the Indiana supported SGO scholarships with over $21 million in donations resulting in nearly $11 million in SGO credits awarded to Indiana residents. This is a reason to celebrate! But wait, most SGO organizations are not dancing in the streets. Why? Because last fiscal year ending June 30, 2018, there were over $12 million in credits awarded to Indiana donors. Giving appeared to have gone down between the 2017-18 and 2018-19 fiscal years. Indeed, our Lutheran SGO of Indiana raised about $500,000 less in donations this past year. What happened? After looking at overall giving data in America for 2018, allow me to break down what we think is some of the overall reasons for the decline in donations. See below: Perceived SGO Tax Changes. The IRS announced a change in how donors could use SGO donations as deductions on their federal taxes in August of 2018; any donation before August 27 would not see any changes, but gifts made after August 27 could be subject to these new limitations. As with any change in taxes, donors didn’t know what to do, and some withheld or lowered their donations. Couple this with the pending changes in the overall tax system that loomed starting in 2019, donors and their advisors were wary. In fact, we still are not 100% sure what can and cannot be done. One theory, therefore, is that this ruling hurt SGO giving.Bunching. To attempt to combat expected changes in the federal tax system, some donors “bunched” their year-end 2018 giving. By “bunching”, they would make a gift of double or triple the usual gift size to ensure they would be able to itemize their charitable giving on their federal taxes. But since the SGO gift for federal taxes was up in the air (see #1), those same donors utilized a Donor Advised Fund for their giving, not the SGO program. This is another reason suggested for the decline.The Stock Market. A third option cited is that not only do an increasing number of donors use appreciated stock and mutual funds to fulfill their charitable donations, but stock gains are used as their personal economic health. The stock market was in decline in December of 2018, and those donors who make their charitable decisions in December may have lowered or halted their gifts. Lack of Urgency. Another theory that I like is a lack of urgency this year. Indiana legislators authorize a set amount of credits every year. Once those credits are out, there are no more donations allowed until the following July 1 when the fiscal year starts over. In the fiscal year 2014-15, the state ran out of credits in early June. We only had to wait a few weeks for the credits to be back. And in FY 2015-16, the credits ran out in February. But then in FY2016-17, the credits ran out in December! With over 6 months of demand for SGO credits unfilled until the start of FY 2017-18, we experienced a “donation deluge” in July of 2018 as donors who normally would have donated between January and June raced to make their SGO gifts in July before they ran out again. These actions most likely boosted our total giving in 2017-18 beyond the norm of what it would have been if we hadn’t run out of credits, and therefore causing a lower comparison in dollars raised between the two years. Its a Blip. The other possibility is that there is just no “usual” in the Indiana SGO world. Especially since every SGO organization appears to be affected evenly. There are just too many factors that can affect our results since the SGO year spans two ½ calendar years. All we can do is promote the benefits to our donors and make it as convenient as possible to support scholarships with online giving, monthly auto giving, gifts of stock, gifts of grain, Paypal, and now we added ApplePay to the mix. At least that is how we see things. What additional ideas would you add to these 5? Contact me at info@lutheransgo.org.
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News and Events
Alicia Levitt | Aug 28, 2019
Hope in a Hurting World
On August 2nd, teachers and staff new to schools in The Lutheran Schools Partnership were invited to participate in a day of professional development to help them meet some of the requirements set forth for school staff by the State of Indiana. This day of training was filled with topics that aren’t easy to hear about or discuss- suicide, child abuse, and human trafficking. Our world is hurting, and our youth are showing the signs. It is vital for our schools to have people trained to recognize those who need help, and to share the love of Christ with all. Teachers and school staff first participated in QPR: Question, Persuade, Refer training on suicide awareness and prevention. They heard the sobering statistics on suicide rates in Indiana, which include a rise in suicide each of the last twelve years. Unfortunately, statistics indicate that this problem is on the rise among young people. QPR training meets Indiana’s requirement to have staff trained in an evidence-based approach to recognizing those who are at risk, reaching out, finding resources, and connecting people in need with appropriate help. The topic of our second training was child abuse and neglect, provided for us by Stop Child Abuse and Neglect (SCAN) of Fort Wayne. As mandatory reporters of child abuse and neglect, teachers must be informed about what to look for and how to respond. Again, sad statistics were shared about the prevalence of child abuse and neglect in Indiana. However, critical information was shared that could save lives. The final training of the day was a relatively new one to the list of requirements for our school staffs, human trafficking. Unfortunately, as many have heard in the local news, the Fort Wayne area is not immune to the dangers of human trafficking. Human trafficking includes any time a person transports or sells another person for the purposes of forced labor or sexual exploitation. The Indiana Trafficking Victims Assistance Program provided the training, which focused on warning signs that someone is in danger of falling victim to trafficking, or has already done so. What heavy topics for our new staff members to hear about, but sadly, how necessary. We live in a sinful world, and our Lutheran Schools are not immune to it. However, in our Lutheran schools, we are able to approach these topics with the knowledge that our God is more powerful than any of the challenges we face in this world. Our loving God gives us hope, provides mercy and forgiveness, and promises never to leave us or forsake us.
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Quality Education
Jessica Neuman | Jun 16, 2019
Beyond Islands
Technically the IDCI - Social Studies Curriculum Team finished three days ago. However, I can’t stop thinking about the great experience I had being a part of this team and pilot program. I had the opportunity to work on something bigger than my own classroom. Together we worked to create something that could be used not just by ourselves but by other teachers and classrooms. This Social Studies Curriculum we created will be made available to pilot schools this Fall. These schools will use the curriculum and critique and leave notes for revision before this curriculum is made available district wide in the Fall of 2020.Here was something I poured passion into. I am passionate about teaching and helping students grow of course, but I am especially passionate about Lutheran Education. Here was the opportunity to work on something that was not only for the efforts of teaching students Social Studies and meeting standards, but something that was especially for us in our Lutheran Schools. A curriculum that was challenging and goal-setting but also Lutheran. Distinctly Lutheran with faith tie-ins to each unit. In Lutheran Schools we know Jesus isn’t a subject that gets taught in a 40 minute block. Jesus is throughout our day and here was the chance to help fuse Jesus into Social Studies. There are times in teaching in Lutheran Schools where you may feel like an island. You may be the only teacher in your building teaching your particular subject or your particular grade level. You don’t always have the opportunity to talk to others about what they’re doing in their classrooms. When you see teachers at conferences or even at round tables you exchange a few ideas but you still go back the following day to your island. In our Social Studies efforts, we created something that can help your island feel a bit closer to the mainland. Here is a chance to see what each other is doing and use it to help all of our students grow and learn- not only in subject matter but also in The Word and their faith.Initially when I read about the team I was skeptical to sign up. I was sure there were people more knowledgeable and more qualified than I to serve on this team. At the urging of my husband I went ahead and applied and was placed on the 5th grade team. I had the opportunity to get to know another teacher from another school in another part of the Indiana District. I enjoyed comparing notes on teaching 5th grade as well as comparing notes on ministry opportunities and future plans and goals. In a room of Lutherans it’s not uncommon to see someone you recognize and certainly not uncommon to know some of the same people. Through this opportunity I grew in my own community and had the chance to get to know people not only from other schools in Fort Wayne, but also from other parts of the Indiana District. I had the opportunity to learn how other Lutheran schools operated and heard about the challenges and successes that other schools have. This unique opportunity to work together and get to know others is not something I will soon forget.
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School Choice
Alicia Levitt | Sep 01, 2019
Why Choose Lutheran Schools: The Elementary Years
Elementary school, usually categorized as including grades K or 1-5, sets the stage for young people in so many ways. Many positive characteristics can be seen in the elementary years. Students in these grades are growing academically by leaps and bounds, developing strong foundations in reading and math, and ready themselves to a deeper dive into new concepts. Students look up to their teachers and want to be like them in many ways. Students in these grades often love to help their parents, their teachers, their fellow students, and others. Many reasons exist for choosing a Lutheran education in the elementary years. First, the smaller class sizes and well-qualified teachers often help students experience above-average academic growth. Setting the stage for future academic success is a tremendous responsibility that our teachers take seriously. What a blessing for the students in our Lutheran schools to have great role models - people who love Jesus and love to share Him with others. Positive, supportive, non-parent adults have been identified as a top developmental asset for young people. No, our teachers are not perfect, since all of us are sinners! However, it is wonderful to know that our teachers are encouraged to strive to grow in their own faith daily and lead our students to do the same. Tapping into our students’ servant hearts is a hallmark of our Lutheran schools. Most of our schools participate in service projects as classes, as a school, through chapel offerings, and together with the other schools in The Lutheran Schools Partnership in our annual joint chapel offerings project. Elementary students have a need to feel needed, just as we all do. By finding new ways they can help others, we help them follow these words of Christ, "A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another," John 13:34. The elementary years are so much fun! Seeing the amazing development of these students from year to year is a privilege of working in the Lutheran schools. Partnering with families to help them along the path of development is another privilege. What a blessing to families as they help their children grow academically, socially and emotionally, and spiritually.
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SGO
Jon Dize | Apr 29, 2019
Attend Learn & Lead 2019
It's time again for our annual Learn and Lead, a conference for area schools, churches, RSOs, and other faith-based nonprofits. Staff, boards, committees, etc. can all benefit. And you can send staff to one day, both days, or either day. We have discount codes available, so contact us at 260-203-4510 or jond@tlspartnership.org. To sign up, visit here.