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FAITHFUL. FOCUSED. FOR YOU.

Your family will fit right in! Visit a Lutheran School today.

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Lutherans founded the first elementary school in Indiana, public or private. We’re committed to educational excellence.

WELCOME TO THE LUTHERAN SCHOOLS

We are 17 elementary and middle schools across northeast Indiana, plus Concordia Lutheran High School. Find a Lutheran School near you.

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Faithful. Focused. For You.

The Lutheran Schools Partnership represents more than 4,000 students enrolled in 17 elementary and middle schools across northeast Indiana, plus Concordia Lutheran High School in Fort Wayne. With so many options available, you’re sure to find the right fit for your child!

Lutheran schools are Christ-centered, nationally accredited, and follow Indiana state standards. Private tuition assistance, SGO grants, and Indiana Choice Scholarships are available to help make the Lutheran schools affordable.

Our commitment to education runs deep. Lutherans founded the very first school in northeast Indiana in 1837, and it still serves students today. Come discover why Hoosier parents have been choosing Lutheran schools for more than 175 years!

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Best Practices
Alicia Levitt | May 26, 2019
Reflecting on Another School Year
The end of the school year has come, and rather quickly, it seems! The final days of a school year are often filled with many emotions. Joy, sorrow, regret, fulfillment, and more can mingle together in our hearts and minds. As students, teachers, and parents say goodbye to a school year, the way we reflect upon the year can be a powerful tool.Recent research on the topic of reflection by Dr. Carol Dweck, Dr. David Yeager, and others has focused on how reflection affects our mindset and ability to change our thinking. When we intentionally reflect on an experience by thinking or talking about it and especially by writing about it, our ability to grow and learn from that experience increases significantly (Dweck, et al., 2014). Our school year is an experience through which we can grow by reflecting. Perhaps there is a particular area in which a student has been struggling. How can we point him or her toward the growth they have achieved? How can we reflect upon the struggle in ways that demonstrate that change is possible? How can we remind students of their successes? We can guide reflection in many powerful ways. Having a discussion during which we share our “roses and thorns” helps us to reflect on the good and the bad. Writing ourselves a letter to be opened in a number of years can be a fun way to think about how our growth will look in the future. Keeping a journal is another powerful reflection tool. Looking for more ideas? Here is a fun list of reflection questions that can be used with students in a classroom or at home, and it includes a link to another list of questions teachers can ask themselves, as well. No matter what, let us not forget that we are reflecting on the blessings that the Lord has provided for us. Scripture tells us often not to forget, notably in Psalm 103:2, “Bless the Lord, oh my soul, and forget not all His benefits.” May we always do so!
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Christian Leadership
Alicia Levitt | May 26, 2019
Reflecting on Another School Year
The end of the school year has come, and rather quickly, it seems! The final days of a school year are often filled with many emotions. Joy, sorrow, regret, fulfillment, and more can mingle together in our hearts and minds. As students, teachers, and parents say goodbye to a school year, the way we reflect upon the year can be a powerful tool.Recent research on the topic of reflection by Dr. Carol Dweck, Dr. David Yeager, and others has focused on how reflection affects our mindset and ability to change our thinking. When we intentionally reflect on an experience by thinking or talking about it and especially by writing about it, our ability to grow and learn from that experience increases significantly (Dweck, et al., 2014). Our school year is an experience through which we can grow by reflecting. Perhaps there is a particular area in which a student has been struggling. How can we point him or her toward the growth they have achieved? How can we reflect upon the struggle in ways that demonstrate that change is possible? How can we remind students of their successes? We can guide reflection in many powerful ways. Having a discussion during which we share our “roses and thorns” helps us to reflect on the good and the bad. Writing ourselves a letter to be opened in a number of years can be a fun way to think about how our growth will look in the future. Keeping a journal is another powerful reflection tool. Looking for more ideas? Here is a fun list of reflection questions that can be used with students in a classroom or at home, and it includes a link to another list of questions teachers can ask themselves, as well. No matter what, let us not forget that we are reflecting on the blessings that the Lord has provided for us. Scripture tells us often not to forget, notably in Psalm 103:2, “Bless the Lord, oh my soul, and forget not all His benefits.” May we always do so!
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Funding the Mission
Mark Muehl | Aug 18, 2019
Giving USA 2019 Report on 2018, Part 3: Where do We go from Here
We are last post look at the Giving USA 2019 Report. Part 1 summarized where 2018 generosity came from. Part 2 looked at where the charitable dollars went in America. So, where do we go from here? I will start with a quote from a Recent Post by Clif Christopher of Horizons Stewardship: “Financial resources are not our mission, but they are the fuel that propels the mission. Without money, there can be no mission and no ministry in these days when the faith is struggling around the world. What caused the latest decline? Some will blame the last tax law changes that significantly increased the standard deduction and thus reduced the number of people who itemize. Others will say that it just reflects that fewer people are in church and the world is more secular…” To summarize some of our findings: Over $427 billion was donated to charitable causes in America. over 85% of giving is coming from people.The stock market was in a bit of turmoil at the end of 2018 and curtailed December giving.⅔ of families give until 2008; now just over 50% give.Giving did not plummet as those opposed to the current White House occupant opined, but we need to determine if giving decline is a blip or a start.Expected changes in the tax laws may have affected decisions. Studies show that even if donors do not itemize, the possibility of loosing that itemization option could be a powerful mental block to donations. People may think they give logically, but they give emotionally a majority of the time.The recovery from the 2008 downturn is slower than expectedWhen compared to when Boomers were in their 20s, Millenials are not donating as much; either they aren’t going to church as much or have been shaped by their experiences through the Great Recession in some way.To continue that quote from Mr. Christopher: “...I do not buy into the theory that the causes are all external and thus any solution must be external. I still hold to the conviction that the solution is within the church to save the church, but we have avoided the hard work necessary to make the cultural adjustment to get it done. In the strongest possible way, I am encouraging you to re-examine how you are teaching and preaching financial stewardship. How are you moving your church away from the stewardship methods of the 20th century and responding to a new 21st century culture?” What should our Lutheran churches and schools be doing today and tomorrow: How about these: 85% of donations are still from people; engage them with your vision. How can you encourage giving from a place of joy rather than a sense of guilt?Individual giving as a percentage of disposable personal income as remained around 2%. What would happen if that changed by a percentage point? Engage with donors; get them to give stock when the market is up and consider monthly giving to minimize any market vagarities.Educate donors that giving to charity is a HORRIBLE way to save taxes! Sure, if you can itemize, a gift of $100 may only cost you $60, but you could just fold that $100 bill in half, place it in your pocket, and save $100. People give to where their hearts are. Turn them into Cheerful Givers.Donors may have created Donor Advised Funds for their charitable giving last year; try an appeal to your database of folks and remind them to give to you from those DAFs! And remember, the timing of their giving from DAFs may not fit the due dates of your light bill. Be prepared for changes in how your donations flow in.Religion and education are still the top giving destinations: take encouragement in that!The impact of high net worth donors is rising; it used to be “80-20”; 80% of the money comes from 20% of the donors. Reality is trending to 90-10. Even 95-5.How can your school or church increase your focus on gifts through estates and wills?If it is true that charitable giving is declining, and if children learn their charitable giving habits from their parents and grandparents, our churches and schools need to stop fleeing from discussions on Stewardship and support. We need to teach the joy of giving! Our futures depend on it.Create a vision to address any demographic changes happening to our congregation and enrollment sources now.Embrace technology like payroll giving, online giving, monthly/automatic giving.From Techsoup, survey your existing donors and nondonors to determine their propensity to donate given changes in the new tax law, for example.Focus your organization's fundraising efforts on diversifying giving options. Hire a fundraising staffer!Pray and Let the Holy Spirit do His work.And remember, it may still be complicated, but all we have and will have is from God. We are stewards. Let’s Catch the Lutheran Spirit, support quality, Christian education, and keep our heads up, looking forward.
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News and Events
Mark Muehl | Jun 27, 2019
The IT Girls
This Summer, CLHS graduate Hayley Grisez is running her second year of The IT Girls, a technology camp for middle school girls. In spring last year, CLHS tech services director and teacher Scott Storm recommended Hayley for the National Center for Women in Information Technology (NCWIT) Aspirations in Computing Award and won District Honorable Mention. This year, Hayley earned the District Award which also made available an entry into NCWIT’s AspireIT program. Thanks to NCWIT, Hayley applied, earned the chance and then won a grant for informational technology and its connection with the social issues of women in the workplace. With the partnering of The Lutheran Schools Partnership staff of Alicia Levitt and Mark Muehl and the support of Mr. Storm, Hayley created the curriculum, made a budget, made an entire marketing effort, recruited assistants for the camp, recruited participants, and covered all the details the grant demanded for a second year. What was Hayley’s motivation? “I love technology and I enjoy seeing the girl’s eyes light up when they figure out the next challenge or know that they can do something techy”. The IT Girls easily got on board with Hayley’s excitement and the first year of camp was fantastic! This year participants will work with Scratch coding, explore Java programming and work with Lego Mindstorm Robots. Their big project will be working with circuits and conductive paint! Through last year’s experience, Hayley learned the importance of having back-up plans and not letting the unexpected ruin the day. She is using this to plan an even better camp for this year. Last year’s camp and prep for this year’s camp “affirm my knowledge in the overall field of technology and my enjoyment for the field”. She also learned how to be a better leader. “Lead but not be a “know-it-all,” is what she shared. Phrase things so you don’t shut the girls down. The week “Helped me understand what good teaching needs to be.” It affirmed for her the effective teaching she has had in her life. Her dad (problem solving), Mr Storm (content from IT classes) and Miss Volmerding from St Peters (teaching strategies) all played roles in a week of fun and learning. Hayley is looking to add more participants to this year’s camp and needs your help! If you know any girls that would be interested, encourage them to sign up! More information and registration can be found on the camp website: The-IT-Girls.com Hayley will be attending Purdue this fall to study Engineering Technology Teacher Education and looks forward to growing The IT Girls!
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Quality Education
Jessica Neuman | Jun 16, 2019
Beyond Islands
Technically the IDCI - Social Studies Curriculum Team finished three days ago. However, I can’t stop thinking about the great experience I had being a part of this team and pilot program. I had the opportunity to work on something bigger than my own classroom. Together we worked to create something that could be used not just by ourselves but by other teachers and classrooms. This Social Studies Curriculum we created will be made available to pilot schools this Fall. These schools will use the curriculum and critique and leave notes for revision before this curriculum is made available district wide in the Fall of 2020.Here was something I poured passion into. I am passionate about teaching and helping students grow of course, but I am especially passionate about Lutheran Education. Here was the opportunity to work on something that was not only for the efforts of teaching students Social Studies and meeting standards, but something that was especially for us in our Lutheran Schools. A curriculum that was challenging and goal-setting but also Lutheran. Distinctly Lutheran with faith tie-ins to each unit. In Lutheran Schools we know Jesus isn’t a subject that gets taught in a 40 minute block. Jesus is throughout our day and here was the chance to help fuse Jesus into Social Studies. There are times in teaching in Lutheran Schools where you may feel like an island. You may be the only teacher in your building teaching your particular subject or your particular grade level. You don’t always have the opportunity to talk to others about what they’re doing in their classrooms. When you see teachers at conferences or even at round tables you exchange a few ideas but you still go back the following day to your island. In our Social Studies efforts, we created something that can help your island feel a bit closer to the mainland. Here is a chance to see what each other is doing and use it to help all of our students grow and learn- not only in subject matter but also in The Word and their faith.Initially when I read about the team I was skeptical to sign up. I was sure there were people more knowledgeable and more qualified than I to serve on this team. At the urging of my husband I went ahead and applied and was placed on the 5th grade team. I had the opportunity to get to know another teacher from another school in another part of the Indiana District. I enjoyed comparing notes on teaching 5th grade as well as comparing notes on ministry opportunities and future plans and goals. In a room of Lutherans it’s not uncommon to see someone you recognize and certainly not uncommon to know some of the same people. Through this opportunity I grew in my own community and had the chance to get to know people not only from other schools in Fort Wayne, but also from other parts of the Indiana District. I had the opportunity to learn how other Lutheran schools operated and heard about the challenges and successes that other schools have. This unique opportunity to work together and get to know others is not something I will soon forget.
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School Choice
Mark Muehl | Feb 11, 2019
Religious Liberty White Paper
The Indiana Non-Public Education Association (INPEA) supports the religious diversity and religious liberties of our member school communities. Every child is an individual, and every student arrives at school with a unique set of abilities, needs, and goals. That’s why the diversity of Indiana’s schools is one of our state’s greatest strengths. Hoosier families choose from a broad range of school types, academic settings, and educational programs. The choices available in Indiana help ensure that every child’s individual needs are met.Schools are not all the same, but all contribute to an educated citizenry. All of Indiana’s schools — public and non-public, secular and faith-based — serve the common good. This is no less true of religious and parochial schools. The first schools in our state were founded by religious communities long before public schools were organized, and many continue to serve students today.Many Indiana families voluntarily choose to enroll their children in faith-based schools. This choice is protected by Indiana law. Among INPEA’s 400 members are schools affiliated with Catholic, Lutheran, Christian, Jewish, Adventist, Muslim, or independent and non-denominational faiths.Religious faith and expression are not purely private matters to be confined to the four walls of a church, synagogue, or mosque; rather, faith is something to be lived out in community. Therefore, every faith-based school has the right and the responsibility to define its mission, programs, and practices according to the sincerely held religious beliefs and traditions of its faith community.Hoosier families and students participating in the income-based Indiana choice programs do not, and should not give up their right to select a faith-based school. In 2013, the Indiana Supreme Court ruled unanimously that the Choice Scholarship Program does not violate the Indiana Constitution. In 1925, the United States Supreme Court, in Pierce v. Society of Sisters, affirmed as a fundamental principle of liberty that the child is not the “mere creature of the state.” This landmark decision excluded any general power of the state to force children to attend only public schools, consequently upholding the natural right of parents to choose the means of educating their children. Likewise, non-public schools choosing to participate in state accreditation or choice programs do not forfeit the right to define their missions, programs, and practices according to sincerely held religious beliefs and faith traditions.INPEA encourages its members to disclose information about school mission, religious beliefs and practices, curriculum, and expectations of students, parents, employees, and guests. Our faith-based schools should share detailed information about religious beliefs and practices, school mission, admissions procedures, religious instruction, employment criteria, facility use policies, expectations of student conduct, disciplinary procedures, and handbooks for students, parents, and personnel. These resources must be clear, consistent, and affirmed by all associated with the school. Religious belief and expression are the first liberties guaranteed by the Bill of Rights of the United States Constitution. INPEA supports the religious diversity and the religious freedoms of our member school communities, and their ability to educate all students who choose to attend. (This whitepaper was adopted by the Board of Directors of INPEA in February 2017. The Lutheran Schools Partnership (TLSP) is a member of INPEA.)
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SGO
Jon Dize | Apr 29, 2019
Attend Learn & Lead 2019
It's time again for our annual Learn and Lead, a conference for area schools, churches, RSOs, and other faith-based nonprofits. Staff, boards, committees, etc. can all benefit. And you can send staff to one day, both days, or either day. We have discount codes available, so contact us at 260-203-4510 or jond@tlspartnership.org. To sign up, visit here.