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FAITHFUL. FOCUSED. FOR YOU.

Your family will fit right in! Visit a Lutheran School today.

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Lutherans founded the first elementary school in Indiana, public or private. We’re committed to educational excellence.

WELCOME TO THE LUTHERAN SCHOOLS

We are 17 elementary and middle schools across northeast Indiana, plus Concordia Lutheran High School. Find a Lutheran School near you.

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Faithful. Focused. For You.

The Lutheran Schools Partnership represents more than 4,000 students enrolled in 17 elementary and middle schools across northeast Indiana, plus Concordia Lutheran High School in Fort Wayne. With so many options available, you’re sure to find the right fit for your child!

Lutheran schools are Christ-centered, nationally accredited, and follow Indiana state standards. Private tuition assistance, SGO grants, and Indiana Choice Scholarships are available to help make the Lutheran schools affordable.

Our commitment to education runs deep. Lutherans founded the very first school in northeast Indiana in 1837, and it still serves students today. Come discover why Hoosier parents have been choosing Lutheran schools for more than 175 years!

Student working from home
 
Best Practices
Mark Muehl | Apr 06, 2020
Face to Face in the Days of Home Based
Navigating the rapid changes for schools in the last few weeks has been a tremendous job for administrators and teachers. While some of our schools had participated in e-learning in the past, not all had experience with delivering instruction in this way. Extended remote learning is also very different from a few days of e-learning. Students not only need academic instruction, but they have new needs for social connection and encouragement. Administrators and teachers have made decisions not only about how to deliver instruction, but more importantly, how to make connections with students and families, and minister in new ways. What sets our schools apart during this time? It’s all about Jesus. While innovative and fun ways to educate our students remotely have been plentiful in our schools, much of the impact they are making is through ministering to students and families in meaningful ways. Daily devotions and chapel are being provided through emails and on social media. Led by principals, teachers, and pastors, these devotions connect our students to Jesus and God’s Word, and provide encouragement to those who are anxious, fearful, and lonely. Because social distancing can feel isolating, our schools are finding new ways to connect to students and their families. Many teachers are calling their students at home. Many classes are meeting virtually through Google Hangouts, Zoom, Facetime, and other online meeting platforms. Being able to hear the voice of their teacher or see the faces of their classmates is joining God’s people together and providing encouragement to students and teachers. Teachers are using these tools as a means to check in with their students and their families, letting them know that they are cared for and missed. Administrators are using the same tools to meet with their faculties to check in and have discussions. Classes are sharing prayer requests, singing together, and laughing together-good medicine, for sure! The Lutheran Schools Partnership is using Zoom to meet as a staff and to gather area principals for weekly meetings. These touchpoints with principals allow us to share ideas, discuss challenges, and pray together. This week, principals were joined in our Zoom meeting by the staff of Cross Connections Counseling, who offered words of wisdom for supporting students, families, and staff during these challenging days. We are tremendously blessed to have these opportunities for face to face connections and support.The amount of time and work that our educators are putting into caring for the whole child is commendable, for sure. While they care for their own families and needs, they are also learning how to use new tools, planning for quality instruction, and considering ways they can help students and families in need. God has provided us with great servants in our schools, who deserve our thanks and respect. May we have opportunities to show that to them and encourage them in their work!
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Christian Leadership
Jon Dize | Apr 20, 2020
Lead, Champion, and Collaborate for Today and Tomorrow
This is the hardest thing I've done in ministry… It's reinventing school to be virtual without any preplanning, training or even the right tools.... and trying to run the business of paying people and keeping revenue. -- TLSP Member School Principal The preceding quote was shared with us from one of the 19 Lutheran school administrators in northeast Indiana, as pictured here during a recent virtual principal gathering. But it could be the thoughts of any one of these leaders. During this COVID19 crisis, they are looking for effective ways to provide school ministry, to be responsive to the unavoidable changes and mandates currently in Indiana, to support their teachers with the best tools available, and to keep the doors open until things get back to normal. For over 10 years, your support has allowed The Lutheran Schools Partnership (“TLSP”) to be a leader, a champion, and a collaborator for 19 Lutheran schools in northeast Indiana, their associated churches, and their 300 educators by promoting academic excellence, enrollment growth, and financial sustainability... In good times and in times like now. TLSP school responses to COVID19 health precautions have been strongly supported by our TLSP staff. Be it within our non-public school network, through the councils formed by TLSP to share and equip, or providing constant spiritual and emotional support, we have been driven to walk alongside your schools. As Martin Luther wrote, "When schools flourish, things go well and the church is secure... God has preserved the church through schools." (Luther’s Works Vol 54) The picture above is just one of the many ways that your gift will continue the support of quality, Christian education, and educators, that have been the hallmark of Northeast Indiana since 1837 from Kendallville to Decatur, from Ossian to New Haven, and from in a building or at home. Your support will continue to lead, champion, and collaborate for a strong Lutheran education today and tomorrow. Sincerely, Mark Muehl Executive Director You can support TLSP with a donation to: 1601 St. Joe River Dr, Fort Wayne, 46805 or visit our website at https://www.thelutheranschools.org/support
Clhs speaker
 
Funding the Mission
Jon Dize | Jun 29, 2020
Thank a Billion, Mr. & Mrs. Volunteer
We recently celebrated Volunteer Week. Please allow me to say Thanks. Thank you. Wow! Great Work! I am guessing that most of you reading this post is, or has been, a volunteer. Maybe it was helping your church decorate for Christmas. Or helping out during Vacation Bible School. Maybe you are an elder or played the organ during a funeral. Maybe you go to Lutheran Life Villages and help transport patients for their chapel services or stuff envelopes at Worship Anew. Maybe you mentor at Lutheran Social Services or helped the CLHS band members on and off the field. Maybe you served on the school board of one of our partner schools in NE Indiana. Maybe you are one of the dozens and dozens of former board members of The Lutheran Schools Partnership over the last 10 years, or serve on a standing committee. Maybe you helped promote the SGO program during the seniors club meeting. According to Independent Sector, the average value of a volunteer’s time is $25.43/hour in 2018. As the report indicates, “about 63 million Americans volunteer about 8 billion hours of their time, talent, and effort to improve and strengthen their communities.” That comes to approximately $203.4 billion. Make sure you say thanks the next time you see someone volunteering. Volunteers do help make the world go ‘round, and are hard to replace. Thanks for joining us on the ride to be leaders, champions, and collaborators. We couldn’t help 19 schools and nearly 400 educators without your help. Each of you should use whatever gift you have received to serve others, as faithful stewards of God’s grace in its various forms.-- 1 Peter 4:10 ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.’-- Matthew 25:40
 
News and Events
Mark Muehl | Aug 03, 2020
"Why We Need Our Schools" - TLSP VIP Signature Event
What reasons do you hear for lack of attending or lack of support of Lutheran schools? Too expensive. Too risky. Not addressing my child’s needs. Hypocritical. Not a priority. Just too hard to justify. These and more have been mumbled or quite audible by members of our churches, pastors, parents, and even teachers. Past financial support of Lutheran education is looked at in awe as congregational members would take out a second mortgage just to assure that their Lutheran school would be a place where kids would be hearing the Gospel every day. In a sermon from 1870, a founder father our church, C. F. W. Walther, reflected on the sacrifice and commitment of the Saxons trek Missouri because of a “living and powerful faith, our highest possession and treasure?” He went on the say in the same sermon to speak to this commitment to the Lord by saying,”Our only real object was to save our souls, to live our faith here, to establish the true and correct public worship, and to maintain a truly Christian school for our children.” (Schools of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, Stellhorn, Concordia Publishing House 1963. P 49) In his video invitation for the TLSP Signature event, “Boldly and Without Fear,” the Rev Dr Gregory Seltz confidently says,”Now more than ever the church and its schools need to be teaching about God’s moral order of the world as well as God’s saving of the world.” Rev Seltz is quick to share that when he first was commissioned to be the head of the Lutheran Center for Religious Liberty (http://www.lcrlfreedom.org/) he quickly realized the need for the Center’s efforts to be supporting and encouraging our synod’s Lutheran schools and universities. His enthusiasm is contagious and we look forward to his message. It’s almost pathetic that we who are greatly blessed to have an abundance of early childhood programs, K-8s and a high school in our little part of Indiana are too often tepid and timid toward these great blessings. Too expensive? Talk to the school leaders. It’s more affordable than you might conclude. Too risky? The risk is greater to not have a child in the nurture of Christian teachers and within a community of forgiveness. Not addressing a child’s unique needs? It happens, and sometimes we hang our head knowing a need was missed. But the communication needed from home to school and school to home takes work and dedication. Hypocritical? It’s a favorite term to be placed on a Christian. Perfect love and obedience is not found in our schools other than through knowing the perfect love and life of Jesus. Not a priority? Being in heaven with me is my ultimate goal for my parenting of my kids, even as they are young adults and having their own kids. I can find no greater priority than sharing Jesus with kids...and doing it daily. It’s time to enthusiastically, or as Rev Seltz says, “Boldly and without fear,” raise up our schools as priorities, as caring communities, as bastians of moral strength and as places where Jesus is known. Your prayers, your words of enthusiasm and your monetary support are needed. Catch the Lutheran Spirit.
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Quality Education
Mark Muehl | Aug 02, 2020
Faces of Anxiousness and Faith
The grandsons have left the house for their next stop and ultimately for their new home in Michigan. Sebastian and Theodore are wide eyed, energetic boys who leave a path of toys wherever they have been. During their stay with Oma and Papa, they’ve been treated to playgrounds, a tractor and combine, llamas, pigs, cows, chickens and kitties- all of which were new experiences for a couple of kids born in Houston. We miss those little dickens already- partly because it’s soooooooo quiet in the house- quiet in sound and quiet in movement and energy. It’s been quite a year for the family. Mom and Dad had to adjust as teachers providing remote learning by a school where e-learning had been non-existent (yes, both as Lutheran school teachers). Dad not only made that adjustment but also was nearly (are you ready for this?) a full time law student. COVID19 retreated the young family into their two bedroom apartment (along with their high energy, herding Australian Shepherd). Before their own version of hunkering down occurred, it is quite possible that the whole family experienced versions of the aforementioned virus. Fevers, difficulty breathing, nausea, aches and pains- in one fashion or the other, all four experienced the symptoms....in late January and February. That being said, there is much to be thankful. No more trips for us to Houston- 3 hours is sooooo much better than the 17 hour drive or the daylong travels of flying. Dad has taken the bar and has a strong job in place that starts in September. Mom gets to be a stay at home mom this year. No apartment life; it's now a three bedroom rental house...with a fenced in backyard. How are the grandsons? Their actions are a good reminder of what we all are seeing in kids. As Dad had been away for a few weeks to cram for the bar, now the two little boys are keeping an eye on Dad. No leaving the house without a whimper or not expecting demands to come along. There are lots of questions about when they are heading to their “white house.” Demands for cuddling help make the mornings and evenings quiet. Sleep is done reluctantly- will Dad be around when those eyes open? Attention is demanded with excitable screams and glances of approval. A nearly three year old boy and a 16 month old are not keenly able to share their worries- with words. Their actions do speak loudly and those actions speak of anxiousness. As the school year begins this week for at least one of our Lutheran schools (the rest will open in the following week), teachers are taking time to be reminded that in various levels of sophistication, students (and colleagues) will probably exhibit their version of anxiousness. Our worlds have been threatened and changed in the past 6 months. Those changes have had their effects- some are obvious, some not as much. In weeks to come, we will reflect on webinars shared by Dr Kim Marxhausen (http://kim.marxhausen.net/). On Thursday, Dr Marxhausen shared “Taming the COVID19 Anxiety Monster” and “Building Emotional Muscle Through Teaching the Faith.” The content was specific for the teachers and administrators but the content speaks to parents and grandparents. Stay tuned for those insights. Here’s my reflection- As one grandson acts like a leech with Mommy and both seem to keep their eyes on their Daddy, it’s a good lesson for us as we take on the anxiety of this life. Both Mommy and Daddy may get a bit worn from the attention of their boys- and we understand. However, those visuals remind us of how each of us should react to our own duress. Latch onto Mom? That’s exactly what we are invited to do with our Heavenly Father. The Psalmist exclaims, “My soul clings to you; your right hand upholds me.” (Psalm 63:8) That latching on is done in confidence knowing that God holds us priceless, We are each a pearl of great price! Hebrews 12:2 encourages us to “fix our eyes on Jesus.” Our confidence is found in Him; we week His face. We seek His will. Those are good lessons for us. Hunkering down has caused a lot of concern for self. It’s not healthy for mind, body or soul. Be sure you are seeking the Savior’s face- in prayer, in Bible reading, in worship. Be assured that while we as frail humans may get frayed by the clamoring of our kids, our Heavenly Father enjoys our attention. Be it screams of frustration, tears of sadness or running eagerly to hear His Words, our Heavenly Father loves with an unconditional, unwavering, never sleeping eye.
 
School Choice
Mark Muehl | Aug 03, 2020
"Why We Need Our Schools" - TLSP VIP Signature Event
What reasons do you hear for lack of attending or lack of support of Lutheran schools? Too expensive. Too risky. Not addressing my child’s needs. Hypocritical. Not a priority. Just too hard to justify. These and more have been mumbled or quite audible by members of our churches, pastors, parents, and even teachers. Past financial support of Lutheran education is looked at in awe as congregational members would take out a second mortgage just to assure that their Lutheran school would be a place where kids would be hearing the Gospel every day. In a sermon from 1870, a founder father our church, C. F. W. Walther, reflected on the sacrifice and commitment of the Saxons trek Missouri because of a “living and powerful faith, our highest possession and treasure?” He went on the say in the same sermon to speak to this commitment to the Lord by saying,”Our only real object was to save our souls, to live our faith here, to establish the true and correct public worship, and to maintain a truly Christian school for our children.” (Schools of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, Stellhorn, Concordia Publishing House 1963. P 49) In his video invitation for the TLSP Signature event, “Boldly and Without Fear,” the Rev Dr Gregory Seltz confidently says,”Now more than ever the church and its schools need to be teaching about God’s moral order of the world as well as God’s saving of the world.” Rev Seltz is quick to share that when he first was commissioned to be the head of the Lutheran Center for Religious Liberty (http://www.lcrlfreedom.org/) he quickly realized the need for the Center’s efforts to be supporting and encouraging our synod’s Lutheran schools and universities. His enthusiasm is contagious and we look forward to his message. It’s almost pathetic that we who are greatly blessed to have an abundance of early childhood programs, K-8s and a high school in our little part of Indiana are too often tepid and timid toward these great blessings. Too expensive? Talk to the school leaders. It’s more affordable than you might conclude. Too risky? The risk is greater to not have a child in the nurture of Christian teachers and within a community of forgiveness. Not addressing a child’s unique needs? It happens, and sometimes we hang our head knowing a need was missed. But the communication needed from home to school and school to home takes work and dedication. Hypocritical? It’s a favorite term to be placed on a Christian. Perfect love and obedience is not found in our schools other than through knowing the perfect love and life of Jesus. Not a priority? Being in heaven with me is my ultimate goal for my parenting of my kids, even as they are young adults and having their own kids. I can find no greater priority than sharing Jesus with kids...and doing it daily. It’s time to enthusiastically, or as Rev Seltz says, “Boldly and without fear,” raise up our schools as priorities, as caring communities, as bastians of moral strength and as places where Jesus is known. Your prayers, your words of enthusiasm and your monetary support are needed. Catch the Lutheran Spirit.
 
SGO
Mark Muehl | Aug 03, 2020
"Why We Need Our Schools" - TLSP VIP Signature Event
What reasons do you hear for lack of attending or lack of support of Lutheran schools? Too expensive. Too risky. Not addressing my child’s needs. Hypocritical. Not a priority. Just too hard to justify. These and more have been mumbled or quite audible by members of our churches, pastors, parents, and even teachers. Past financial support of Lutheran education is looked at in awe as congregational members would take out a second mortgage just to assure that their Lutheran school would be a place where kids would be hearing the Gospel every day. In a sermon from 1870, a founder father our church, C. F. W. Walther, reflected on the sacrifice and commitment of the Saxons trek Missouri because of a “living and powerful faith, our highest possession and treasure?” He went on the say in the same sermon to speak to this commitment to the Lord by saying,”Our only real object was to save our souls, to live our faith here, to establish the true and correct public worship, and to maintain a truly Christian school for our children.” (Schools of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, Stellhorn, Concordia Publishing House 1963. P 49) In his video invitation for the TLSP Signature event, “Boldly and Without Fear,” the Rev Dr Gregory Seltz confidently says,”Now more than ever the church and its schools need to be teaching about God’s moral order of the world as well as God’s saving of the world.” Rev Seltz is quick to share that when he first was commissioned to be the head of the Lutheran Center for Religious Liberty (http://www.lcrlfreedom.org/) he quickly realized the need for the Center’s efforts to be supporting and encouraging our synod’s Lutheran schools and universities. His enthusiasm is contagious and we look forward to his message. It’s almost pathetic that we who are greatly blessed to have an abundance of early childhood programs, K-8s and a high school in our little part of Indiana are too often tepid and timid toward these great blessings. Too expensive? Talk to the school leaders. It’s more affordable than you might conclude. Too risky? The risk is greater to not have a child in the nurture of Christian teachers and within a community of forgiveness. Not addressing a child’s unique needs? It happens, and sometimes we hang our head knowing a need was missed. But the communication needed from home to school and school to home takes work and dedication. Hypocritical? It’s a favorite term to be placed on a Christian. Perfect love and obedience is not found in our schools other than through knowing the perfect love and life of Jesus. Not a priority? Being in heaven with me is my ultimate goal for my parenting of my kids, even as they are young adults and having their own kids. I can find no greater priority than sharing Jesus with kids...and doing it daily. It’s time to enthusiastically, or as Rev Seltz says, “Boldly and without fear,” raise up our schools as priorities, as caring communities, as bastians of moral strength and as places where Jesus is known. Your prayers, your words of enthusiasm and your monetary support are needed. Catch the Lutheran Spirit.